Thursday, October 8, 2015

Testing, testing: True Bias Roscoe Blouse

I was a tester for the newest True Bias pattern, the Roscoe Blouse and Dress, a boho-style, loose-fitting peasant blouse or dress with raglan sleeves, a gathered, split neck with ties.



I chose to test the blouse version, View A... my first test was a bit of a let-down, but purely due to my fabric choice. I used this bright melon colored gauze that I bought on the street in Hong Kong. It's very crinkly with much more mechanical stretch than I anticipated. It stretched so much, width-wise, as I cut, sewed and pressed it that my whole blouse ended up like 3 sizes wider in the body, neckline and cuffs by the time I was done with it! Damn, poor fabric choice can really kill a project, can't it? I'd used gauze recently for my Mojave cover-up, but didn't run into this problem because it wasn't the super crinkly variety.

This is my second version, a winner!:


For my second version, I choose this super lightweight cottony stuff from my stash. I bought it a couple years ago from one of the vendors in Bangkok's China World fabric mall, mostly because I liked the color combo, it was cheap and it's crazy soft.


The fabric is a bit of a b*tch to cut, though. Shifty and impossible to keep straight. Because of my difficulty cutting this fabric, even though I cut it in one layer rather than on the fold, my pattern matching across the raglan sleeves is not the best. I think all the gathers sort of camouflage it a bit, though, so I'm not too bothered by it.


Sewing notes below!

(PS: what is happening with my hand in these photos? I think I was going for "casually tucking hair behind my ear" but ended up with "exasperated but happy 1980s sitcom mom."):


I accidentally forgot to trim the neck facing before turning it under, so the binding on my neck split is wider than Kelli calls for. I couldn't be bothered to unpick it.


Turns out I am terrible at stitching in the ditch, so I ended up finishing the neck binding and cuffs by topstitching. If I were using a fancier fabric, like silk, perhaps I would bust out some hand sewing for this, but that wasn't going to happen for this casual blouse.


This is the tester version and a few minor changes were made for the final Roscoe pattern, including lengthening the blouse a bit. For this version, I just serged the hem and turned it up 1/4".


My final verdict: I really like how my Roscoe turned out!! It's hard to go wrong with True Bias patterns...

I wouldn't say it's exactly my typical style, but damn, a soft flowy blouse feels nice in Bangkok's heat! I'm wearing it here aspirationally styled for the autumn that I wish Bangkok had... skinny jeans and suede booties that would never fly during Thailand's current rainy season:

25 comments:

  1. Ahhhh, I love it! Boho isn't my usual style either, but I like this pattern a lot.

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    1. Thanks, Nicole! I was pleasantly surprised at how much I like this pattern even though it's outside my normal style!

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  2. I really love the Roscoe blouse. Although, I have a lot of similar patterns in my stash...so I can't justify another. ;) But your's is awesome. That fabric is wonderful and it looks great on you. :)

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    1. Thanks, Andie! Yeah, there is no shortage of peasant blouses in the sewing pattern universe, but surprisingly I didn't have any in my possession until now!

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  3. Yep, I think I'm going to need this pattern! I love the fabric you used!

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  4. Love that print for the style of the top

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    1. Thanks! Yeah, this print was just screaming out to be a Roscoe blouse!

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  5. I wasn't sold on this pattern until I saw your version. You have convinced me! Looks fantastic on you.

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  6. You always have the best fabrics, Meg! I love that blouse on you. Perfect with jeans or leggings and it certainly looks comfy.

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    1. Thanks, Tanya! Ha, this fabric is not the best quality, but I loved the print so much that I just had to have it. Yes, Roscoe is super comfy- like wearing pajamas!

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  7. Your version of this pattern is beautiful. I couldn't find a sizing chart on the True Bias web site. Can you clue me in?

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    1. Thanks, Angie! Hmmm... if you go to this link to the True Bias shop (http://shop.truebias.com/product/roscoe-blouse-dress) and then look beneath the large photo, you can click on an image that has the size chart, fabric requirements, etc. Sorry, it's hard for me to link directly to it.

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    2. Ok, now I see it. :) Thanks. I'm about 1.5-3" bigger than the largest size. Do you think I'd be ok using it since it's so loose fitting? I haven't learned how to grade up a pattern yet.

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    3. Hmm... well, there is definitely a lot of ease in the pattern, but I don't want to advise you to buy something that may end up not fitting! I am looking at my copy of the pattern and it says the finished chest measurement of the largest size is 56.5 inches. Hope that's helpful to you in making your decision!

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  8. You look cute in this! I'm going to go check the pattern out now, I never would have seen it without your blog. (thanks!)

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  9. I think this looks fantastic on you! The fabric is perfect and how can you go wrong with skinny jeans and little boots.

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    1. Thanks, Heather! I was glad I remembered I had this fabric- it really was just right for this pattern!

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  10. This is very cute and wearable. Your pattern matching across the sleeves is admirable, IMO. You have access to such great fabric!

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  11. This cottony stuff certainly work for this blouse, it looks fab. I agree, sometimes wrong fabric choices can kill a project. I have a Washi dress in fabric so stiff I feel like a bag of potatoes in it, so I don't wear it. My last attempt at making a tee was a disaster also...

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    1. Thanks, Jenya! Fabric choice really can make or break a project... and even after years of sewing it's easy to make a wrong move with texture, print, stretchiness, drape... Eek! Bag of potatoes is not a good feeling - been there!

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  12. Very cute top- great fabric! I understand the "where do I put my hand" problem! You want to show the sleeve but seriously, where do you put your hand to show the sleeve?!

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