Friday, January 15, 2016

Herringbone Jersey Metropolitan Verano


After my first Hot Patterns success, I decided to treat myself to a few of their paper patterns for Christmas, including the Metropolitan Verano blouse and dress (HP 1138) (which is on sale right now...)!


I was attracted to the slouchy but sexy vibe of the pattern and the cool little twist at the front bodice.


The fabric is some herringbone print jersey I bought a while back from the Imagine Gnats shop (affiliate link), originally intending to make another Appleton dress from it. But when I got it, I thought it was a bit lightweight for a negative-ease dress like the Appleton. I thought this insanely soft jersey might lend itself better to a very drapey pattern like the Metropolitan Verano.


I love how the herringbone "stripes" turned into a chevron at the upper bodice. Very cool!


After making this pattern in a jersey, though, I am realizing that it would be possible to make it in a drapey, non-stretch fabric, too, such as rayon challis. It's pretty loose throughout, and, as far as I can see, there are no parts of the blouse that truly require stretch.


Size-wise, I went one size down from my size according to the envelope based on my experience with the Hot Patterns Shirt-tail T, as well as some reviews of the Metropolitan Verano pattern that I read online (see Fabric, Thread, Clothes? and this review). There is still a lot of room and length in the upper front bodice. Perhaps it was designed for a bustier woman than I?


When I sewed this blouse, I used the lightning bolt stitch on my sewing machine and pressed all the seams open. My serger tends not to like very lightweight knits and its been a bit cranky with me lately. 


The blouse has a binding on the back neckline and a facing on the front v-neck. I used a bit of stretch interfacing on the front neckline, which helps it keep its shape. We'll see if it pops out when wearing... so far so good.


I decided not to hem the sleeves or the bottom of the blouse. Hemming these light-weight jerseys can be a nightmare and the fabric looked fine with a raw edge. I also left the twist portions unhemmed (you could do a narrow hem on those if your fabric frays).


The back of the blouse is cut in 4 pieces (2 upper and 2 lower), but I don't see why you couldn't cut it in 2 pieces on on the fold. I could stand to lose a bit of length in the upper bodice if I make it again:


The armholes hang a little bit low, so my bra band shows a bit under my arm, but it's not a dealbreaker for me.


On the inside, there is no casing for the elastic waist. The elastic is just sewn directly on inside of the waist seam with a zigzag stitch. You can't see the stitching in my busy print, but might look a little messy in a solid. Also, the elastic is sorta free-floating for a few inches in the area behind the twist, which is a little weird, but not uncomfortable


Final verdict: I like it! A great blouse for super drapey and lightweight knits. I might make a few tweaks next time I make it, but I am pretty happy with it! You know me, I love a blouse that can be dressed up (I'm wearing it here with my Deer and Doe Brume pencil skirt) or paired with jeans. 

18 comments:

  1. I will be interested to hear if you continue to like this fabric after a full day of wear. I found that it had horrible recovery -- I felt like I was wearing a sack at the end of the day -- and the seams started to shred after one round through the wash (maybe the weave was too loose for my serger)? I ended up tossing the dress I made, with regret.

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    1. Oh no- that sucks! I remember you were unhappy with your Appleton in this fabric, which is why I ended up changing plans. I'll see how it goes... there is no place on this blouse where the jersey is actually stretching, so I hope it doesn't end up stretched out. But shredding seams- eeeek! And, boo!

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  2. That's so nice! I tried on a similar knot-front design in Topshop the other day when I was 'shopping' for sewing ideas and was trying to figure how it was made, so I'll take a look at this pattern.

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    1. Thanks, Katie! Glad I'm not the only one "shopping" for ideas. Salespeople hate me- always touching the clothes, never buying them!

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  3. You look great in this style! Very slinky and pretty without being skin-tight. I love the little twist at the waist. Personally, I find lightweight jerseys to be almost unbearably difficult to work with, but this is the perfect style for that tissue-weight (shudder shudder) rayon jersey.

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    1. Thanks, Inder! Yeah, I'm not a big fan of working with the tissue-weight jerseys, especially for anything that needs to be stretched into place (neckbands and the like). It was ok for this blouse because you treat it more like a woven... no stretching! I definitely used my sewing machine rather than serger, though, because of how lightweight the fabric was.

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  4. Very pretty top and the shape is very flattering on you. Love it paired with your pencil skirt.

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  5. Very nice Meg! Love it.

    I've been scarred away from Deer and Doe by their "hourglass" descriptions. What do you think? Lodi

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    1. Thanks, Lodi! Umm... I would say that the Deer & Doe is fairly hourglass-y. I think they design with a C-cup, small waist...

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  6. Very nice Meg! Love it.

    I've been scarred away from Deer and Doe by their "hourglass" descriptions. What do you think? Lodi

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  7. Great outfit! I'm glad you posted that the skirt was a Brume - the whole time I was admiring it and wondering whether it was Mabel and wondering how I could get Mabel to fit me like that (I've made three and a half of them now and I can't get it to a size/shape that I like) - perhaps I need to ditch Mabel and try Brume. The blouse is cute on you - I particularly like the fit in the shoulders and the vneck.

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    1. Thanks, Masha! I think I prefer the shaping of the Brume to the Mabel. Mabel is much straighter and sits lower. The Brume sits higher (better to keep my love handles in check) and has all that nice butt shaping and seaming.

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  8. I really like this blouse! It's something different, and that fabric is perfect for it. I'm loving these Hot Patterns reviews! I can't wait to see what else you make.

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    1. THanks, Heather! I'm having fun trying out a new-to-me pattern company! I can't wait for your review of the Hot Patterns boyfriend jeans...

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  9. Very cool - so much more interesting than a basic tee pattern! Cool fabric!

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