Friday, May 8, 2020

Shibori Seamwork Quince

I've been sitting on this fabric since last summer, waiting for inspiration to strike!


This fabric piece of linen/rayon blend from Joann (I think it's the hopsack linen?) that I had shibori dyed with indigo last summer. I used the super basic bunch-and-rubber-band method on this piece to get the concentric circles.


You can see the piece right after it was taken out of the dye bath below. It lightened significantly from the initial deep blue to a more faded denim blue, but I still quite like it. I got some good definition on my circles, so I'm happy with that!


I wanted a pattern that wouldn't break-up the print too much: big pattern pieces, not a lot of seam lines. Enter Seamwork's Quince pattern!


Note: I am a Seamwork Ambassador, which means I received a one-year subscription in exchange for sewing up 10 of their patterns and providing some feedback to Seamwork about their patterns, articles, etc. If you use this link, you can get a little discount if you decide to purchase from Seamwork.


So, for my Quince, I cut a size 12, which is several sizes down from what I would cut if I went by my body measurements. I took a cue from Hayley, who has similar-ish measurements to me. I liked the fit on her denim version.


My fabric was 2 yards by 52 inches, so eking the shorter version of the Quince pattern out of it was tight, even in the smaller size.

Plus, I wanted to avoid the dreaded target boob, so I had to be very careful with my cutting. I cut with the fabric flat, not folded, to maximize what I had.


I cut the back piece on the fold (minus the seam allowance, of course) so I wasn't bisecting one of my shibori circles. The center back seam was straight, so I wasn't losing any shaping or anything.


There wasn't enough fabric to cut the cuffs, but that was ok because I had decided previously that I didn't want the cuffs anyway. I wanted to show a bit of wrist; I like the balance of a little skin with the otherwise oversized jacket. I just hemmed the bottom of the mid-sleeve piece by about 5/8 of inch.


I did have just enough fabric for the patch pockets, but ultimately decided not to use them. The look was a bit much with the pockets and this print.


The Quince pattern is simple, but effective. I like the slight curve on the front bodice so it hangs well on the bust.

I also found it interesting that, rather than have a curve from side seam to sleeve, it has a sharp 90 degree angle. I haven't decided if it affects the fit in any particular way.


 I'm pretty smitten with the final project! I think it really shows off this special fabric.

It definitely has a bit more of a "hippie" feel to it than I normally go for, but I think it pairs well with with lots of pieces in my handmade wardrobe.

Here I'm wearing it with my Ninni culottes and double gauze Torrens Box Top, which is perhaps a bit voluminous overall. But I think it will also look nice with my new Zadie, with jeans and a t-shirt, and many others...


2 comments:

  1. You're in Vermont! A bit of hippie -ness is perfectly appropriate ��. Great job on the dyeing, wonderful finished product, congratulations

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  2. the jacket is fabulous, and I love how you teamed it with the simple tee and wide leg pant. A wonderful outfit altogether.

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